kateri

Due to the current situation in our country, this event is cancelled.

We are sorry for the inconvenience it may cause.

The KAIROS Blanket Exercise program promotes reconciliation through public education and understanding. It fosters equality, truth, understanding, respect and reconciliation among Indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.

In partnership with KAIROS and Kateri Native Ministry, the Blanket Exercise will be offered to organizations working within the Bronson Centre on Sunday March 8th, 2020 – International Women’s Day from 2 pm to 4:30 pm

Kateri Native Ministry is facilitating a Kendasawin Training Session (Bilingual) on Saturday March 7, 2020 from 9 am to 2:30 pm. at Paroisse Sacré Coeur, 591 Cumberland St Ottawa, ON.

For more information, please contact the Parish Development and Peace Office.

Due to the actual situation in our country, we decided to cancel our monthly sharing circle this month.

Thank you for your understanding.

Taking into consideration the health of our community, and following the Archdiocese’s directives, our mass this Sunday March 15 is cancelled.

Miigwetch.

We will have our two parts of Lenten Retreat this year on Wednesday March 04, and Wednesday March 18, from 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm at Bronson Centre, 211 Bronson Ave, room 310.

Come to Pray with Us!

We have Mass on Ash Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 6:30 pm at our Bronson Centre location (211 Bronson Ave, Room 310).

All are welcome!

We will have our monthly Indigenous Mass on Sunday 16 February 2020 at 11 am at 211 Bronson Ave, Suite 310. It will be followed by our usual potluck.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Reflecting on the challenge and opportunity of the COVID-19 pandemic

Easter greetings!

As co-chairs of Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle we would like to offer a few reflections on how, in this period marked by COVID-19, we may be faithful and vigilant in our efforts of renewing and fostering relationships between the Catholic Church and Indigenous Peoples in Canada. Above all let us encourage one another and pray for an outpouring of compassion and kindness so that this period of physical isolation brought on by the pandemic may be also a time of social cohesion and solidarity. May we stay open to the many ways that the Risen One is walking with us, making all things new and turning all things to the good.

We would like to add our voices to those who have expressed gratitude for the many loving actions that are manifestations of care and compassion. We raise our hands and hearts in thanks for Indigenous leaders, health care professionals and community care workers who continue to tend to the sick and to care for the elders and vulnerable community members. As faith leaders we want to express a special thanks for the spiritual leaders, knowledge-keepers, ministers and healers from the many different traditions who have worked together to help individuals and communities stay healthy in mind, body and spirit. May Our Creator bring their courageous work to fulfillment.

This time of isolation is ironically a time that has sensitized many of us to our common humanity and called us to a deeper unity and solidarity. However, the COVID-19 crisis has also shone light into the darkness of what has been tolerated and accepted for too long. It has highlighted the oppressive vulnerability of many Indigenous communities: Communities that suffer from inadequate and over-crowded housing; those that lack clean water; under-funded and inadequate health and community services as well as unreliable infrastructure that are at greater risk and result in communities living with heightened fears. While some places in Canada may be sensing the threat is receding, that is not so among those who have been often abandoned. As Paul Coehlo writes in Warrior of Light: “Those people who look on other’s misery with indifference are the most miserable of all.” These are days that call for a deeper commitment and firmer resolve.

As co-chairs of Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle we encourage people during this crisis to be particularly mindful of the vulnerability of Indigenous women and children. We must not forget the truth revealed by the National Inquiry on murdered and missing Indigenous women and children. Those who have lived under threat of violence are experiencing increased vulnerability during this time of isolation.page2image1464312000

We encourage an increased vigilance on behalf of those who are incarcerated. The Indigenization of Canada’s prison population has been identified rightly as a national travesty. It is imperative for federal, provincial, municipal and Indigenous governments to develop a decarceration plan that will relieve the dangerous conditions in prisons and provide care for the health and safety of inmates.

Now, at the beginning of spring, Mother Earth is bursting forth with sure signs of her own resilience. Each new morning, we are reminded that as night gives way to day, death will give way to new life. This pandemic will pass. As we look forward to recovery let us take as our guide this Easter message of the Holy Father:

I hope that this time of danger will free us from operating on automatic pilot, shake our sleepy consciences and allow a humanist and ecological conversion that puts an end to the idolatry of money and places human life and dignity at the centre. (Pope Francis, Letter to the Popular Movements, 12 April 2020)

While there are already competing visions of recovery surfacing, Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle, in the words of Pope Francis, is called to be watchful and ready to stand alongside those Indigenous and non-Indigenous “builders of this change that can no longer be put off”, so that our recovery will not be a return to the normal, which was already in crisis, but the creation of a renewed and reconciled unity.

May the Lord lift up your hearts during this Easter Season and always.

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Yours in the Risen Christ,

Rosella M Kinoshameg

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Co- Chair
Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle

(Most Rev.) Murray Chatlain Archbishop of Keewatin-Le Pas

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Co- Chair
Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle

Message to Kateri Native Ministry and All Indigenous Catholics

Dear Donna, Father Hasina, dear brothers and sisters in Christ;

Under ordinary circumstances this would have been the annual Long Weekend in May at which you gather for healing, reconciliation and building a hope-filled future.

I was looking forward to being with you for Mass, conversations and exchanges. However, the Covid-19 pandemic requires that we be apart to protect the health of all, especially our elderly and vulnerable persons. So I can be with you only through this message. In it I wish to assure you of your presence in my thoughts and prayers, especially as you gather this Sunday for Mass and a spiritual communion through social media.

Next year, my presence will be as the emeritus or retired archbishop of Ottawa and Cornwall. My successor has been named, even if it will be some time before he assumes office. He is Coadjutor Archbishop Marcel Damphousse, of the Sault Sainte Marie diocese, which has a sector devoted to Catholic indigenous peoples. He was also for three years Bishop of Alexandria-Cornwall, which is close to Akwesasne. You may count on his support for Kateri Native Ministry and all whom you represent.

Today’s Mass takes us back to Jesus’ farewell address to his disciples at the Last Supper. He tells us that after his death, resurrection and ascension, he will send us another “paraclete”, another one who will bring us comfort, consolation and peace.  He speaks of the Holy Spirit—and don’t we need that gift of someone defending us, standing by us—in this time of the Corona virus—but also to help bring us the healing we and Canadian society need!

Jesus says he will send another “paraclete” another defender to stand by us, because he is our first defender and stands by our side.  May this message bring you the inner joy and peace you desire for yourselves, for all in your family and your community and in our country Canada.

Jesus says, “Love one another as I have loved you”. Jesus does not say, “Love me as I have loved you”. Instead, Jesus says, “receive the love I freely give you, right up to my dying on the cross for you and rising again to give you my risen life and my Holy Spirit and, having received my love, pass it on to others near and far.”  Wow! What a big challenge! But with God, all things are possible.

God bless you one and all!

Terrence Prendergast, S.J.

Archbishop of Ottawa-Cornwall 

May 17, 2020